Columbia Cylinder Records
1889-1908

Columbia is the oldest record company in existence today and goes back to the very beginning of the commercial recording industry in 1889. It was officially founded the year previous and quickly became part of the monopolistic North American Phonograph Company of investor Jesse H. Lippincott until 1894. It had a regional monopoly over Washington D. C., Maryland and Delaware until Lippincott's company crumbled and it went independent and national. One may wonder why I listed Columbia below Victor since the latter doesn't show until 1900. Well, Victor's dominant role in maturing the industry in the first quarter of the 20th Century causes me to begrudgingly do so. Before Victor even appeared though and like Edison, Columbia issued wax cylinders that were either directly recorded, dubbed or moulded depending on the timeframe. Unlike Edison, it started issuing discs too when Victor appeared on the scene and quickly became its chief rival. When discs went double-sided in 1908 Columbia saw no need to continue its own cylinder recording, even though it bought the newly-formed Indestructible Phonographic Record Company as a subsidiary and issued cylinders (made of celluloid) for a few more years before cutting that company loose again.

* - a subsequent artist who remade the selection by an earlier performer, therefore a re-release; however, only the release date by the first artist is ever known and thus given

Encoded Speed: 192 Kbps


Unfiltered
Why Don't You Write a Letter Home?
Steve Porter
Columbia Brown Wax #4593
released 1897-1900
Note: Extreme wear and mold. 120 RPM.


Unfiltered
Farmyard Medley
Male Quartette
Columbia Brown Wax #9037
released 1896-1900
Note: Extreme wear and mold. Sounds best at 140 RPM.


Unfiltered
A Bad Little Boy's Version of "Jack, the Giant Killer"
Harry Spencer
Columbia Brown Wax #11090
released 1896-1900
Note: Extreme wear and mold. 120 RPM.


Unfiltered
Sea Flower Polka
Columbia Orchestra
Columbia Brown Wax #15023
released 1896-1900
Note: Extreme wear and mold. 120 RPM.


Unfiltered
The Capture of Santiago
Columbia Orchestra
Columbia Brown Wax #15191
released 1898-1900
Note: Extreme wear and mold. 120 RPM.


Unfiltered
The Charge of Roosevelt's Rough Riders
Columbia Orchestra
Columbia Brown Wax #15195
released 1898-1900
Note: Extreme wear and mold. 120 RPM.

The Midshipmite

words by Fred E. Weatherly, music by Stephen Adams


'Twas in fifty five, on a winter's night,
Cheerily my lads yo - ho!
We'd got the Rooshan lines in sight,
When up came a little Midshipmite,
Cheerily my lads yo - ho!

"Who'll go ashore tonight" says he,
"An' spike their guns along wi' me?"
"Why, bless 'ee, sir, come along" says we,
Cheerily my lads yo - ho!
Cheerily my lads yo - ho!

With a long, long pull, An' a strong, strong pull,
Gaily boys, make her go,
An' we'll drink tonight,
To the Midshipmite,
Singing cheerily my lads yo - ho!

We launch'd the cutter and shoved her out,
Cheerily my lads yo - ho!
The lubbers might ha' heard us shout,
As the Middy cried, "Now, my lads, put about!"
Cheerily my lads yo - ho!
We made for the guns, an' we ram'd 'em tight,
But the musket shots came left and right,
An' down drops the poor little Midshipmite,
Cheerily my lads yo - ho!
Cheerily my lads yo - ho!

With a long, long pull, An' a strong, strong pull,
Gaily boys, make her go,
An' we'll drink tonight,
To the Midshipmite,
Singing cheerily my lads yo - ho!
The Midshipmite
J. W. Myers
Columbia Brown Wax #5609(-4)
1901-1904

Scene in a Police Court
Harry Spencer*
Columbia Black Wax #31694(-10-16)
released March 1902
Note: Very worn. Skip at 0:51.

The Hoosier Hollow Quilting Party
Invincible Quartette
Columbia Brown Wax #32237(-3)
released October 1903
Note: Worn.

Dear Sing Sing
Billy Murray with Orchestra
Columbia Brown Wax #32374(-4-2)
released March 1904
Note: Heavy mold.

Golden West March
Prince's Military Band
Columbia Black Wax #33102(1-14); (7-1037-1-14)
released April 1907

I'm Afraid to Come Home in the Dark
Arthur Collins
Columbia Black Wax #33232(-1-12)
released March 1908
Note: Worn.

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